Tag Archives: millions years

Microbes and nutrient cycling

A nutrient cycle refers to the exchange of organic and inorganic matter in an ecosystem, resulting in the sequestration, elimination, recycling, and generation of particular substances and elements in the environment. Microbial life has long been known to play a vital role in consuming and regenerating resources in the environment …

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Plate tectonics could be the source of all life on Earth (and on alien planets too)

Plate tectonic activity has been blamed for major earthquakes and tsunamis since the idea, first put forward in 1912 by meteorologist Alfred Wegener, has existed. Subduction forces obliterated entire continents during the 3.2 billion years that plate tectonics occurred on our 4.5 billion year old Earth. The planet’s crust is …

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Bad astronomy | Impact of an ancient asteroid on the Wyoming/Nebraska border

It wasn’t a dinosaur killer, because it happened just before they appeared. But the idea is the same*. An asteroid about 4 kilometers wide – nearly half the diameter of the Chixulub impactor – slammed into Earth at 70,000 kilometers per hour. The fantastic kinetic energy of the asteroid’s motion …

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Puffy planets lose atmospheres and become super-Earths – Eurasia Review

Astronomers have identified two different cases of “mini-Neptune” planets losing their puffy atmospheres and likely transforming into super-Earths. Radiation from planets’ stars strips their atmospheres, causing hot gases to escape like steam from a pot of boiling water. “Most astronomers suspected that young, small mini-Neptunes must have evaporating atmospheres,” says …

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It used to be their world, now it’s yours – Red Bluff Daily News

Here’s something readers probably won’t find in another Red Bluff Daily News column: Andrew Knoll is best known for his contributions to Precambrian paleontology and biogeochemistry. He discovered microfossil records of early life around the world and was among the first to apply the principles of taphonomy and paleoecology to …

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Five Duke professors named AAAS Fellows for 2021

Five members of the Duke faculty have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are part of the 564 new members elected for their efforts in favor of the advancement of science or its applications in the service of society. “Becoming an AAAS Fellow …

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Conserve natural resources | Cashmere amount

Conserve natural resources We must take care of natural assets and it is the responsibility of every citizen to preserve natural resources Posted on Dec 26 2021 | Author MANSOOR SHAFI God has granted us paradise in the form of a biosphere supporting the life of flora and fauna. In …

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Antarctic air bubbles indicate Earth’s oxygen thief

Share this Item You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. An unknown culprit has been removing oxygen from our atmosphere for at least 800,000 years. Analysis of air bubbles preserved in Antarctic ice for up to 1.5 million years reveals the likely suspect. “We …

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What is geomicrobiology?

[ad_1] Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of microbes in the geological and geochemical processes that shaped the earth and continue to function today. Microbes play a vital role in the recycling, generation, sequestration and elimination of a wide variety of substances and chemicals in the environment Going through …

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How astronomers reconstruct the surfaces of invisible alien worlds

[ad_1] The Universe is filled with planets. Astronomers have so far confirmed more than 4,500 worlds, of which more than 1,500 are rocky terrestrial planets. Within our solar system, the rocky planets – Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars – are very different from each other. But once you start looking …

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Here is – the foldability of tectonic plates

[ad_1] A new study presents a new way for tectonic plates – massive plates of rock that jostle to position themselves in the earth’s crust and upper mantle – to bend and sink. It’s a bit of planetary Pilates that could solve the long-standing mystery of “subduction,” the process by …

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Ancient Groundwater – Our Time Press

[ad_1] Why the water you drink can be thousands of years old As surface water recedes in the western United States, people are drilling deeper wells and tapping into older groundwater that can take thousands of years to replenish naturally. Marissa gruneAlain seltzerKevin M. BefusSome of North America’s groundwater is …

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Hot coal and photosynthesis – one answer – the Island

[ad_1] I wish GADS had stuck to its hesitation, without displaying its ignorance of basic chemistry and global gas cycles to defend its precious fossil fuels. Let me clarify: Carbon (C), the fourth most abundant element in the Universe, after hydrogen (H), helium (He) and oxygen (O), is the cornerstone …

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The slow carbon cycle, sink and waste | Clubs And Organizations

[ad_1] Dive into the slow carbon cycle! Fluxes include: respiration and photosynthesis (between the biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere), sedimentation and metamorphosis (between the biosphere and lithosphere), weathering, erosion, volcanism and combustion of fossil fuels (between the lithosphere and the atmosphere), dissolution and degassing (between the hydrosphere and the atmosphere), and …

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Development or survival? Imbalance – Ground views

[ad_1] Photo courtesy of the BBC Sri Lanka’s country declaration to the 21st Conference of the Parties (known as COP21) to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, held in Paris in 2015, said: “We are aware of the big difference in carbon dioxide emitted by biological sources. …

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The synthetic ecosystem evolving at sea

[ad_1] Like the atmosphere, the magnetosphere and the hydrosphere, the plastisphere is a region. But it is also an ecosystem, like the Siberian steppe or coral reefs – a plasticized marine environment. By Russell Thomas Plastic bottles dominate the trash in the ocean, with around 3 feet of them reaching …

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New evidence of geologically recent Venusian volcanism

[ad_1] Magellan SAR image of Aramaiti Corona. Narina Tholus (center left) appears as two adjacent domes superimposed on the outer west fracture ring. Credit: Institute of Planetary Sciences New data analysis techniques are finding evidence of recent volcanism in old data from Magellanic spacecraft. It is not known if this …

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It turns out that Venus (almost) has tectonic plates

[ad_1] Beneath Venus’s acidic clouds and crushing atmospheric pressure lies a rocky surface strewn with geological mysteries. Sometimes referred to as Earth’s “sister planet” because it is similar in size with a similar iron core, molten mantle, and rocky crust, there is evidence that Venus was once a aquatic world …

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Revenge of the Deep Sea Burrowers | Mirage News

[ad_1] The old seabed diggers have been bullshit for years. These prehistoric churners – a large assortment of worms, trilobites, and other animals that lived in Earth’s oceans hundreds of millions of years ago – are believed to have played a key role in creating the conditions for the flourishing …

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Alarm over unprecedented accumulation of mercury in Pacific Ocean trenches – Eurasia Review

[ad_1] A scientific article recently published in Nature Publishing’s Scientific reports The newspaper found unprecedented amounts of highly toxic mercury being deposited in the deepest trenches in the Pacific Ocean. The study, a multinational effort involving scientists from Denmark, Canada, Germany and Japan, reports the first-ever direct measurements of mercury …

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Melting glaciers have shifted the Earth’s axis

[ad_1] Melting glaciers have shifted the Earth’s axis In the 1990s, the Earth’s axis underwent a major change. It is normal for the Earth’s axis to move a few centimeters each year. But, in the 1990s, the direction of the polar drift suddenly changed and the pace of the drift …

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An urgent call to action from the Nobel Prize winners

[ad_1] Our Planet, Our Future is the title of the 2021 Nobel Prize Summit. As a follow-up to this summit, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recently published Our Planet, Our Future: An Urgent Call for Action d / d April 29e, 2021. The opening paragraph of the …

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Small volcanoes are a big deal on Mars

[ad_1] Life may be at the center of exploration of Mars today, but our planetary neighbor is home to the largest volcanoes in the solar system. Olympus Mons towers 23 kilometers (75,000 feet) above the surrounding landscape, and its neighbors, the Tharsis Montes (Arsia Mons, Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons), …

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The African continent is slowly splitting in two

[ad_1] By David STEIN May 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. An impressive sinkhole has appeared in southwestern Kenya following heavy rains. Scientists see it as another sign of the gradual break-up of the African continent. The events giving rise to this news took place on the morning of March 19, …

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Carbon cycle – WorldAtlas

[ad_1] Carbon is one of the many natural elements that can be found on and in the Earth. It is one of the most abundant elements after hydrogen, helium and oxygen, and is an integral part of all human, animal and plant life. Carbon is particularly important in biology because …

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What subduction teaches about smart design

[ad_1] Photo credit: USGS via Unsplash. My doctoral research focused on the tectonic history of early plates on Earth. Plate tectonics involves the movement of plates on the earth’s surface. It is believed to be driven by subduction, where one plate plunges into the mantle under another plate. Typically, this …

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The UN confirms the ocean is fucked up

[ad_1] The ocean is not doing well. The seas, which contain approximately 332,519,000 cubic miles of water, heat, rise, acidify and lose oxygen. And a new comprehensive UN climate special report, released Wednesday, presents an encyclopedic review of how the Earth’s oceans and ice caps have been altered as the …

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Aquatic voyages through the hydrosphere

[ad_1] Posted on July 2, 2019 through CNRM On May 2, 2019, we did a My Water Journey activity. The purpose of this activity was for us to understand how water moves through the hydrosphere. We wanted to do this project because it would allow us to better understand the …

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Radiocarbon in the oceans – Eos

Radiocarbon dating is a technique used in various disciplines, including environmental science and archaeology. In the geosciences, the processes by which radiocarbon is produced and cycled in the oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere are widely understood, but there is significant variability in radiocarbon concentrations over space and time. In an article …

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